Forum Posts

walkinthewalk
Sep 01, 2019
In Laminitis / Founder
This software is sensitive -- I've lost this post twice and then have to re-set the paragraphs and repost the pic each time. Age: 24 years in August, 2019. Has been living with a fractured sacrum since 2007 that re-fractured in spring 2019. Diagnosed IR in spring 2012. Measuring from the dorsal wall, foundered 8-9 degrees on the LF & 5 degrees on the RF. While he has de-rotated, his hooves will be never be 100%. He also has mild mechanical founder on the rears due to the added stress of his sacrum/pelvic issues. Please note, in the U.S. the term "founder" does not mean the coffin bone went thru the sole as I understand it means in some other countries:) Many of us call "laminitis" the inflammation that leads to varying degrees of coffin bone rotation (founder). We call it "sinking" if the coffin bone has rotated enough to go thru the sole:) Anya, you pretty much know Joker's story -- fractured sacrum in 2007 & re-fractured it this past spring PLUS he dislocated a vertebra. I had to get a traditional vet from 40 miles away to come out as the local farm vets (who know this horse) managed to be "too busy", after they saw the pictures, "what with horse shows coming up and spring calving". It turned out to be the better thing for Joker but was a huge ding in my checkbook. My hollistic vet/chiro/acupuncturist has been seeing him every two weeks until this last visit; he has made it nearly four weeks but Tuesday, September 6th can't get here soon enough for her to see him again. I give him red light therapy and massage pad therapy for ~one hour every morning - unless he says he doesn't want one or both, then he waits until I'm occupied with the other horse, and wiggles around until things fall off:) Joker was diagnosed as IR with numbers three times the high/normal in 2012. Severe founder. AFA certified farrier took too much heel (against the lameness vet's instructions) on the third trim - ultrasounds (vet was purple-in-the-face-livid) showed torn ligaments on both fronts. That involved 11 months of intense therapy/pouticing/hosing on my part, plus dealing with the founder, plus dealing with his bad back - which all of these things work together to keep a horse balanced. Meaning Joker is a train wreck but you wouldn't know it to look at his face. it is a true blessing every morning I go to the barn to find him standing up, ears forward, eyes bright, wanting to know where breakfast is:) Knowing his back story will be important when I put up pictures of his back hooves that are now shod, in a very unconventional/orthotic manner. Joker has been in IR remission since 2015. He has not worn a grazing muzzle since 2015. He takes naps in the pasture, like a normal horse since 2015; once his insulin stabilized and he didn't feel the need to keep eating. He has free access to the barn, hay and two big barrel fans whenever he wants to go in. That is often, ATM, due to our summer heat/humidity & the black horse flies. He has his own 5-6 acres of grazing, as he has to be separated from my other horse who is a pushy bully. Diet - divided into two feedings: One measuring cup 2X/day of straight timothy pellets to serve as a carrier. 3 oz. HorseTech HighPoint vit/min supplement that is soy-free/no added iron. 3,000 IU additional pure Vitamin E (Horse Tech). 28.4 grams additional pure Biotin (Horse Tech). 1 TBS probiotic. 17 grams of Cosequin ASU+ (Plus). It DOES help, my Rottie is also on it. Locally grown orchard grass hay that consistently tests in the 8% range for NSC, when he comes in at night, plus what he eats thru the day. I stopped weighing his hay when his insulin stabilized and he started leaving hay in his tub from the night before. Pictures: I took this pic this AM (09-01-19) simply because my written description of Joker sounds like he's an old reprobate that should be put down. That is not what this happy face with shavings in his forelock is saying:) Along with being the best-hearted horse I've ever had, he is one tough cookie. Hooves: These reset pics were fresh, about three weeks ago. Fronts Rears, which it's pretty obvious Joker is base narrow, plus he "rolls" on the outsides of his rear hooves when he walks - in similar vein to children who walk on the sides of their shoes. Joker is one on the front, a 1-1/2 on the back. These shoes are "Natural Balance" PLR flat steel shoes. Farrier had to cut down and reshape size 2's. She also uses copper nails to help reduce aneroebic issues. The farrier hot shoes, using the shoe to cauterize the whiteline since I can't treat underneath the shoe. I do, however, clean his hooves every day, we don't get muddy, even during deluges, and he comes in every night to clean shavings. We try to keep the WLD down to a dull roar. Joker did not get the VetTec, EquiPac CS this time as it has worn out its usefulness, for the time being anyway. Notice the intentional, slight "overhang" of the shoe on the outsides of the hooves. The purpose is to stop Joker from rolling his hooves, which that action travels all the way up his legs to his pelvis. My farrier did not invent this treatment; she told me this has been done on broodmares -- evidently there are brood mares that people actually care about. The "cuts" she made in one side of the underside of both shoes is for traction on the grass when it rains. The back shoes are held on with six copper nails plus clips because he twists so bad. The fronts only have four nails each plus clips. His shoes are as tight at five weeks as they were when they were put on. Joker is not ridable, so his enviroment allows shoes to last him 4-5 resets. This is the first rear shoeing and is experimental -- everything is subject to what Joker "tells us". So far he likes his shoes. We thought he might be sore but he never sored up. He walked off as if to say "what took all'ya'all so long to figure this out. This is working now but, with Joker, it may not work in six months and my poor farrier will have to come up with something else. She doesn't say anything but I can tell by what she says that she is always talking with vets and other farriers so as to have Plans B, C, D, E, etc ready because Joker is a case study like no other, given all his issues:)
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walkinthewalk
Sep 01, 2019
In Introductions & General
I am finally here -- from the desktop -- the iPad won't co-operate:( The site set up is great! Hope to see a lot of contributors:) I will be back when I have time with a journal of sorts for 24 year old Joker. I will hopefully be able to copy/paste this over to another thread. Anya, you pretty much know his story -- fractured sacrum in 2007 & re-fractured it this past spring PLUS he dislocated a vertebra. I had to get a traditional vet from 40 miles away to come out as the local farm vets (who know this horse) managed to be "too busy", after they saw the pictures, what with horse shows coming up and spring calving. It turned out to be the better thing for Joker but was a huge ding in my checkbook. My hollistic vet/chiro/acupuncturist has been seeing him every two weeks until this last visit; he has made it nearly four weeks but Tuesday, September 6th can't get here soon enough for her to see him again. Joker was diagnosed as IR with numbers three times the high/normal. Severe founder. AFA certified farrier took too much on the third trim, ultrasounds (vet was purple-in-the-face-livid) showed torn ligaments in both fronts. That involved 11 months of intense therapy/pouticing/hosing on my part, plus dealing with the founder, plus dealing with his bad back - which all of these things work together to keep a horse balanced. Meaning Joker is a train wreck but you wouldn't know it to look at his face. it is a true blessing every morning I go to the barn to find him standing up, ears forward, eyes bright, wanting to know where breakfast is:) Knowing his back story will be important when I put up pictures of his back hooves that are now shod, in a very unconventional/orthotic manner, and also suffer from mehanical founder -- gee I wonder why:( Anyway, I'm glad to be here, thank you very much Anya for the invitation:)
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